Open Office Hours: Running chronometric experiments online using PsychoPy3

Our next office hour, hosted by Jordan Gallant, will introduce PsychoPy3, a new experiment development software that uses Javascript to create experiments that can be run on web-browsers.

The first part of the Open Office Hour will be dedicated to the creation of a simple lexical decision experiment. Jordan will demonstrated how it is programmed, hosted, and run using participants recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk.

The second half will be a Q&A where the limitations/possibilities of PsychoPy3 and online chronometric experimentation in general can be discussed.

Host: Jordan Gallant

Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2020 

Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. EST (GMT -4)

Connect via Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/495738797

Open Office Hour: Non-Chronometric psycholinguistic experiments in Mechanical Turk (Part 2)

We are continuing the Open Office Hours dedicated to programming non-chronometric psycholinguistic experiments in Amazon Mechanical Turk. All materials from the first Office Hour and the follow-up can be found at osf.io/cqa2e. The follow-up Open Hour with Victor Kuperman  will cover additional types of experiments (Cloze predictability, plausibility judgments, Rating and Likert scales). It will take place on Friday March 27 at 1-2 pm (Eastern time for US and Canada, GMT -4).

Meanwhile feel free to send your questions to Victor Kuperman (vickup@mcmaster.ca). Also note that all Open Office hours are recorded and the videos will be made available at a later time.

We hope you can join us this Friday!

Host: Victor Kuperman

Date: Friday, March 27, 2020

Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. EST (GMT -4)

Connect via Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/702938796

COVID-19 & Open Office Hours (online)

Due to the uncertainty surrounding the Coronavirus pandemic, many across the Words in the World network have suspended face-to-face operations including experimentation in traditional laboratory environments. We are therefore making a concerted effort to migrate as many of our research projects to an online format as possible. By moving toward this goal, we are working not only to protect the health and safety of our colleagues and research participants, but also to move forward with the majority of our research endeavours.

With these purposes in mind, we’d like to take this opportunity to introduce a new Words in the World feature: Open Office Hours. The purpose of the Open Office Hour is to provide an accessible online version of the traditional university office hour, in which our research partners hold a brief informal discussion on a topic within their expertise and take questions regarding that topic. Our first Open Office Hours are listed below and focus on online experimentation in Psycholinguistic research.

Update

A follow-up office hour with Dr. Kuperman is scheduled for Friday, March 27, from 1 – 2pm Eastern (GMT -4). See the announcement here: https://bit.ly/33K3Svy

“How to collect psycholinguistic data from home: Introduction to crowdsourcing tools”

Host: Victor Kuperman

Date: Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. EST (GMT -4)

Ability to collect experimental data outside of the lab is of great importance for reaching out to populations outside of university convenience subject pools. This importance is even greater when lab testing is undesirable. This first session of “open office hours” will introduce rich possibilities for data collection using crowdsourcing tools like Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (mturk.com). We will cover several basic types of experiments (surveys, collection of ratings, linguistic judgments, and written responses), and discuss practicalities of online testing. Several small experiments will be created and results collected and discussed.

No prior knowledge is expected. The session is designed for 20-30 minutes of an informal presentation, followed by the Q&A. Ideas for experiments are very welcome.

Connect via Zoom: https://bit.ly/394W74o

See the event listing for alternative ways to connect.

“Running chronometric experiments online using PsychoPy3″

Host: Jordan Gallant

Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2020 (GMT -4)

Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. EST

Connect via Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/495738797

Online experiments offer a range of possibilities and benefits that have yet to be fully explored. This office hour will introduce PsychoPy3, a new experiment development software that uses Javascript to create experiments that can be run on web-browsers. In the first half of the office hour, I will demonstrate how a simple lexical decision experiment can be 1) created, 2) hosted online, and 3) run using participants recruited via Mechanical Turk. The second half will be a Q&A where the limitations/possibilities of PsychoPy3 and online chronometric experimentation in general can be discussed.

COVID-19 Update

To all our friends and colleagues:

We hope you are safe in these difficult times.

Following the advice of public health authorities, Words in the World has moved the majority of our operations online. 

The Brock/SHARCNet EEG Analysis Workshop, scheduled for May 11 – 15, 2020, has been cancelled, with the hopes of rescheduling for later in the year. Attendees should receive information directly. 

The organizing committees of STEP2020 (May 25 – May 30, 2020) and the 12th International Conference on the Mental Lexicon (October 6 – 9, 2020) are considering their options in the face of this rapidly evolving situation.

The organizers of STEP2020 have changed the event registration procedures to reflect current global uncertainty and are prepared to cancel the event on short notice. Should STEP be cancelled, there are plans to reschedule at a later date. More information is available here: https://ccp.artsrn.ualberta.ca/portfolio/step/

In the coming weeks, we will be offering a series of Open Office Hours focusing on how to do research while maintaing social distance through the use of online resources. The first session will be about how to use Mechanical Turk, and will offered by Dr. Victor Kuperman (McMaster University) next Tuesday, March 24, from 1pm to 2pm. 

We wish you all well. 

Announcing Clozapp: A Java Application for Collecting and Recording Cloze Probability Norms

We are delighted to announce the release of Clozapp: A Java Application for Collecting and Recording Cloze Probability Norms!

Clozapp is an open source program designed to collect Cloze probability norms, and can be adjusted to work in multiple languages. It has been made available on the Open Science Framework by its authors, including WoW trainee Kelly Nisbet and Co-Applicant Dr. Victor Kuperman. We hope it will be of use to you! 

To read the paper, and to learn where to download the program, read the article here: http://bit.ly/3a5n0WW

ARiEAL welcomes Hamilton-area high school students

The Centre for Advanced Research in Experimental & Applied Linguistics at McMaster University (ARiEAL) welcomed more than 30 students from Hamilton District Christian High School on November 21 to learn about the science behind second language acquisition. The students are studying French, and have an interest in understanding how people learn languages.

Students toured three on-site laboratories, including co-applicant Dr. Victor Kuperman’s Reading Lab, and met with five faculty members as part of their introduction to second language research.

The event was co-sponsored by Words in the World.

New Journal launched by Huettig, Mishra, & Padakannaya (WoW Collaborator)

Cover image of the Journal of Cultural Cognitive Science

Name: Journal of Cultural Cognitive Science

Publisher: Springer

Linkhttp://www.springer.com/psychology/cognitive+psychology/journal/41809

Words in the World collaborator Dr. Padakannaya (University of Mysore) is pleased to announce the Journal of Cultural Cognitive Science and an open call for papers: 

We are delighted to introduce a new journal to the field, the Journal of Cultural Cognitive Science. The advent of this journal reflects the fact that cognitive science cannot ignore culture as a crucial factor impacting mental processes and brain functioning. Today, we have an increasing amount of empirical and theoretical work that emphasizes cultural, social, and bodily influences on mind and brain. A focus on the individual and her experiences has become increasingly important. This approach emerged in all fields that have been associated with cognitive science, from neuroscience to philosophy of mind. This journal aims to be a platform to discuss the latest developments and to present the best empirical work shedding light on such issues.

 

We are thrilled to have a team of excellent associate editors, and we thank Giovanni Bennardo, Zohar Eviatar, and Jyotsna Vaid for their service to the journal and the field. We are also grateful to have a team of distinguished anthropologists, linguists, psychologists, and neuroscientists from across the globe to serve on our editorial board.

 

We invite both rigorous research articles, and thought-provoking theoretical articles. Any paper that advances our knowledge of cultural influences on cognition and the brain is most welcome here. We particularly encourage submissions of research with non-WEIRD (Western, educated, industrial, rich, democratic) participant populations. It is no secret that the vast majority of research in psychology and cognitive neuroscience has been carried out with Western students. It is vital to look at different cultures and diverse participant populations so that we can understand what kind of findings from this mostly Western research body generalize to the world population. After all, we want to understand the human mind and not just the minds of Western undergraduates. We also especially encourage submissions of work from researchers from all parts the world. There is currently an exciting expansion of cognitive science and neuroscience research worldwide, and the many new labs in China, India, Latin America, and the Middle East are pertinent examples of this. Our journal also attempts to support this development. It is within this changing and diverse landscape that we want the Journal of Cultural Cognitive Science to thrive. We look forward to your readership and submission of your best work.

New Master’s degree in Applied Experimental Psychological Sciences

The Department of Psychology at the University of Milano-Bicocca is offering a new Master’s degree in Applied Experimental Psychological Sciences (AEPS), beginning in 2017-2018. The program’s focus is on the application of the psychological sciences to addressing real world problems, throughout a wide range of contexts and domains. The program offers cutting-edge training on the cognitive, social, emotional, and neural processes underlying human thought, behaviour, language, knowledge, and decision making, and emphasizes the development of methodological research skills.

 

International students are encouraged to apply!

 

For more information,  please see the attached flyer (sample image below), and visit the program’s page here.

High resolution: AEPS flyer Page 1 AEPS flyer Page 2

Low resolution: AEPS flyer (single file)